Make It So: Interaction Design Lessons From Science Fiction

Make It So Interaction Design Lessons From Science Fiction Many designers enjoy the interfaces seen in science fiction films and television shows Freed from the rigorous constraints of designing for real users sci fi production designers develop blue sky int

  • Title: Make It So: Interaction Design Lessons From Science Fiction
  • Author: Nathan Shedroff Christopher Noessel
  • ISBN: 9781933820989
  • Page: 183
  • Format: Paperback
  • Many designers enjoy the interfaces seen in science fiction films and television shows Freed from the rigorous constraints of designing for real users, sci fi production designers develop blue sky interfaces that are inspiring, humorous, and even instructive By carefully studying these outsider user interfaces, designers can derive lessons that make their real world deMany designers enjoy the interfaces seen in science fiction films and television shows Freed from the rigorous constraints of designing for real users, sci fi production designers develop blue sky interfaces that are inspiring, humorous, and even instructive By carefully studying these outsider user interfaces, designers can derive lessons that make their real world designs cutting edge and successful.

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      183 Nathan Shedroff Christopher Noessel
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      Posted by:Nathan Shedroff Christopher Noessel
      Published :2018-04-03T04:04:45+00:00

    1 thought on “Make It So: Interaction Design Lessons From Science Fiction”

    1. There are a lot of interesting observations about the scifi aesthetic here. For example: if you want to make your technology look retro, use capital letters and monospace fonts. To evoke advanced technology, use a sans serif typeface. Color coding is often used to differentiate different alien races. Social status must be taken under consideration when depicting a conversation two people where one of them is a volumetric projection, i.e. hologram, so you can't have Darth Vader look like a toy in [...]

    2. I expected this book to draw parallels between interface design in Sci-Fi and the real world. Surprisingly it does not talk about any interface examples in the current real world. It just focusses about different interface systems in movies.The book does not have good content, nor any scientific/data-driven points. Its an opinion piece without making any opinion. Its more of a study of the state of the world of interfaces in science fiction.Avoid this book.

    3. This book has an intriguing premise, but no clear target audience.The premise is to draw interaction design lessons from interfaces in scifi films and tv shows. In theory, because those interfaces visualize the future, they should be able to help designers to imagine interfaces beyond historic constraints.The ostensible audience for these lessons is interaction designers, but the problem with writing for such an audience is that most or all of the lessons presented should already be patently obv [...]

    4. An impressively thorough look at futuristic interactive systems depicted in science fiction media. I have to say that the audience for this book is probably limited to that overlapping segment in a Venn diagram of folks interested in user interaction and science fiction fans. Because it concentrates on fictional systems, the potential practical takeaways are limited (although there's a nifty anecdote about how a topographic engineer for the U.S. Army was inspired by the X-Men movie version of a [...]

    5. God, I wanted to love this book but alas it was not to be. The idea behind the book, that we can push the frontiers of UX design by looking at how UX design is done in Science Fiction TV and movies, seemed like a really great idea, and after the early chapters (particularly the first chapter on mechanical UX) seemed very promising.In the end, however, this book felt a little bit too much like a laundry list of how SciFi has treated various categories of 'fantastic' UX, covering topics like volum [...]

    6. Hoe meer ik nadenk over ‘Make It So‘ hoe enthousiaster ik word. Van een afstand bekeken is het een introductieboek in basisprincipes in interactie-ontwerp, geïllustreerd met science-fictionplaatjes. Maar dat is niet de grootste kracht van het boek. Wat ik het belangrijkst vind is dat het boek je verder laat kijken dan de gangbare patronen van interactie. De eerste hoofdstukken zijn verdeeld over diverse interactiecategorieen, met onder meer mechanische interactie, visuele interfaces, gebare [...]

    7. Science fiction is a good source for interaction design inspiration. Plus it shapes the expectations of the audience how interactions should work, before the technology is ready. See science fiction movies as prototypes where you can evaluate whether a certain interaction could make sense in a future product. The book is an inspirational read if you are interested in possible future interaction paradigms.There is a lot of inspiration in science fiction movies.

    8. I enjoyed this, because combining two topics of interest to me (science fiction and user interface design) could hardly fail to entertain. However, I'd hoped I would actually learn a few things, or maybe at least be able to recommend this as a textbook, and I just didn't find that kind of substance.Basically, I'd just say that if you are interested in both of these topics, you will probably be entertained as I was. That's about it.

    9. Many designers enjoy the interfaces seen in science fiction films and television shows. Freed from the rigorous constraints of designing for real users, sci-fi production designers develop blue-sky interfaces that are inspiring, humorous, and even instructive. By carefully studying these "outsider" user interfaces, designers can derive lessons that make their real-world de

    10. Did a great job of being a fun and yet serious exploration into why science-fiction user interfaces use the approaches they do and how to copy or NOT copy their effects in real UIs (and why). Only three stars however because it got a little long-winded in places and because although it was a fun book, I'm not entirely sure how applicable their learning is to a real design approach.

    11. Entertaining look at human interfaces in the world of science fiction movies and how they can be applied to real-world stuff. Entertaining, but not gripping. This is a book to peruse, not read straight through. Suffers in eBook form, on an eInk eReader, due to the poor resulting quality of the example screenshots.

    12. Well worth dipping in to for insights and inspiration.There are some gaps, but it's also fairly comprehensive. Happily the guys are continuing their work in this area through their website, and actively seek out contributors.

    13. It's rare that I give up on a book, but less than a third of the way through this one I couldn't bare to continue. I now know more about Star Trek than I care to and learned nothing new about interaction design. A disappointing book from the usually great Rosenfeld.

    14. I read this as part of a UX book club at work and I did not enjoy it. In fact, none of us did. It was essentially a lengthy lengthy cataloging of SciFi interfaces with shallow "design lessons" thrown in.

    15. How to make your interfaces (Websites/ apps) look like those from sci-fi movies. Very nice discussion and comparison, lessons learned, caveats and what the authors call 'apologetics'. The wording is a bit awkward and difficult to follow at times, but a fun read.

    16. fun, with more than a few actual useful points mixed in. Some of it is a little silly, but that comes with the territory.

    17. Great concept. There are lots of full-color pictures to illustrate the concepts discussed (and compare movie interface elements side-by-side). But I got bored about 1/3rd of the way in.

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